Entries from March 2010 ↓

How to Motivate Your Music Street Team to Promote Your Music

This week is Street Team Marketing Week.  If you missed the earlier posts where I discussed how to mobilize and manage a street team, you can check out those posts here: How to Build A Street Team, How to Manage a Street Team.

Today, I will discuss three ways you can motivate your street team so they can feel empowered and encouraged to promote your music or music business.

1) Give positive feedback.

Thank your street team for the work they are doing for you.  You should let each of your team members know that their work is valued and appreciated.  Many street teams work really hard and deserve to be thanked for their efforts.  You should recognize the work that they do.

2) Give them a mission.

You should let your team members know how their work supports a broader mission that you are trying to accomplish.  As an artist or business owner, you should have a mission for the music that you do or a mission for your business.  You should communicate that mission to your street team members.  Let your street team know what you stand for, so they can feel like they are a part of something bigger than promoting your music or business.  Show them that they are promoting a cause or serving a bigger mission.

This approach works in the political world with campaign volunteers.  President Obama when he was campaigning, organized one of the most successful political campaigns because he was able to mobilize and energize a lot of young people to volunteer for his campaign.  Think of your street team as a campaign team.  Your street team is campaigning for your music or your business.

So how was President Obama able to mobilize, manage, and motivate the volunteers of his campaign team? In different interviews, members of President Obama’s campaign team mentioned that they felt like they were a part of something bigger than themselves.  They identified with Obama’s mission, to bring change.  What is your mission as an artist or music business owner?  Is it just to sell a lot of records and get paid?  If that is all you stand for, if your mission is to just get paid, then dream bigger and think bigger.

Your street team will not be motivated and energized by a mission that doesn’t involve them or a cause they can believe in.

So how can you learn what motivates the members of your street team? Talk to them! Get to know your street team.  What are their backgrounds, strengths, and talents?  What is important to them?  What do they value?  What do they hope to get out of the experience of being a part of your street team?

When you learn more about your street team and what they want to get out of the experience, then you will be able to meet their needs and satisfy them.  The members of your street team will begin to feel like they are not just helping you, but you are both helping each other.

3) Reward your Members. Reward the members of your street team.  Give them an incentive to do great work.  You should also make sure that you reward members who go above and beyond what is expected.  Some musicians and music business owners like to reward their street teams with the following:

-free t-shirts                            -free music CDs

-free tickets to shows             -free food

So the best ways to motivate your street team is to provide a mission, positive feedback, and rewards.

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Click here to get your FREE 10 video trainings on Music Street Teams: Music Street Team

How to Manage a Music Street Team

This week is Street Team Marketing Week.  Yesterday I shared the components of the 3M Street Team Marketing Plan that I use when I coach my music clients.  The three M’s are: mobilize, manage, and motivate.  Yesterday I discussed how musicians and music entrepreneurs can mobilize a street team.  Read it here: How to Create a Music Street Team

Today I will share 4 tips on how to manage a street team.

Tip #1: Establish a clear structure. If you plan on building a large street team, then you should choose a team leader or multiple team leaders..  A team leader can help you share the workload and the responsibility of managing a street team.  You can delegate some important tasks to the team leader so you can concentrate on your music or music business.  When choosing a team leader, pick someone who is trustworthy and dependable.  The team leader should also have good management skills.  Determine how many team members the team leader will be responsible for managing and determine the team leader’s tasks.  Communicate to your team members the structure of your street team and let them know who they need to report to.

Tip #2: Train your Street Team.  Training is vital.  Give your street team the tools and marketing resources they need to do a great job for you.

Tip # 3:  Provide clear performance expectations. Set the specific goals that you want your street team to accomplish and the time frame to complete these goals.  You should establish your expectations about appearance and dress because remember, when your team members are going out and meeting people, they are representing you.

Tip #4:  Run an Organized Street Team. You should have a policy for tracking and measuring the progress and results of your team members.  You should also conduct regular meetings with the members of your street team or with street team leaders to go over progress and provide feedback.  Have a written agenda for every meeting.

If you have street team members who are in different states or cities, you can utilize social media tools to communicate and collaborate with them.  Good social media tools for collaboration are: Ning and Reverb Nation.  You can also use facebook and twitter.

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Click here to get your FREE 10 video trainings on Music Street Teams: Music Street Team

Build a Music Street Team of People EXCITED to Market and Promote Your Music

Yesterday’s blog post discussed why you need a street team to market your music or music business. If you didn’t read the post, check it out here: Why You Need a Music Street Team

Today I will discuss the “3M Street Team Marketing Plan” that I use with the musicians and music entrepreneurs that I coach.  The 3M Street Team Marketing Plan consists of the 3M’s which are: Mobilize, Manage, and Motivate.  These 3M’s are essential to recruiting and building a music street team of people who are EXCITED to market and promote your music. I am going to share with you what I share with my clients. Today, I will discuss the first phase of the marketing plan, mobilize.

Step 1: Mobilize

The first step in the 3M Street Team Marketing Plan is mobilize.  During this phase of the plan, I help my clients locate the RIGHT people for their street team.  In this step you need to figure out what your mission is for the street team.  What do you want your street team to accomplish for you? Yesterday I discussed the five things a street team can do for you as an artist or music business owner.  Check it out here: Street Team Tasks

Figure out what you need the street team to do for you.  Come up with a list of tasks and jobs.  The next thing that I have my clients do is figure out the types of people who can do those jobs. So for example, if you need someone in your street team to hand out flyers for your next show, then you need to find someone who is personable and has great communication skills. Determine the skills and qualities needed to complete each of the tasks on your list.

Now with that list, brainstorm where you can find people who have those skills and qualifications.  Think of the people in your own social networks (i.e. your coworkers, family, friends, etc) and people who are not in your own social networks who meet those qualifications.

2 places to look to find people for your street team:

Your fan base/Your customers: Your fans are the best people to have your street team because they already like your music and will be excited to go tell others about you.  If you are a music business owner, approach your satisfied customers to be a part of your street team.

Music Conference/Festival: This is an often overlooked source.  The music conference is full of music interns and volunteers who love music.  Go up to these volunteers at the registration tables and tell them about your street team.  These volunteers obviously don’t mind serving and so they are “prime candidates” for your street team.

What qualities and characteristics should I look for?

The best people to have on your street team are people who are go-getters!  You don’t want people who are lazy. You want people who will get the job done and also take initiative.  Find people who can represent you well.  You do not want someone who will damage your image.  You should also look for people who can lead others.  I will talk more about leadership tomorrow.

After you have come up with this list of potential team members, contact these people.  I help my clients come up with a “script” that they can use to approach these people.  Make sure that when you contact your potential team members and ask for their help, that you are clear about what you want them to do.  Be honest and straightforward about the expectations you have for the street team.

To learn more tips on how you can build a street team who can sell more music and get more people to your live show, click on the video below:

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Click here to get your FREE 10 video trainings on Music Street Teams: Music Street Team

Why You Need a Street Team to Market Your Music

What is a street team?

A street team is a group of people who are recruited to promote an event, product, or business.  Many musicians and music entrepreneurs build street teams to promote a show, a new CD, or a new music business.

You should have a street team and an online team.  The online team can have some of the same goals as your street team: marketing and promoting your music or music business.  The main difference between these teams will be the location of where their activities will take place, one team concentrating on the “physical streets”, and the online team concentrating on “virtual” streets and neighborhoods.

5 tasks you can have a street team complete for you:

1) Hand out flyers and posters about you, your music, or your music business

2) Bring friends to your shows or business. Recruit people to come to your shows.

3) Talk about your band or your business online in forums, message boards, and social media sites

4) Maintain your websites and mailing lists

5) Wear t-shirts that promote your music or business

Why you need a street team:

A street team provides musicians and music entrepreneurs with an inexpensive way to promote their music or music business.

Get more exposure: Street teams can help you get your music or your music business exposed to more people.  Take advantage of the networks that your street team members belong to.  Your street team members should have different backgrounds so you can utilize their social networks.  Your street team members should have access to different social networks so you can expose your music or music business to many different types of people, who are within your target audience of course.

Free promotion and free help: Street teams provide free promotion.  FREE! Many musicians build a street team of unpaid volunteers.  This is free help and free marketing for your music or business.  Some street teams are compensated with free merchandise from the musician or business owner. Providing free merchandise is an inexpensive way to get help marketing your music.

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Click here to get your FREE 10 video trainings on Music Street Teams: Music Street Team

This Week: March 22-26 Street Team Music Marketing

All this week on the Music Success Coach blog, I will share strategies and tips on how you can recruit and build a successful and motivated street team who will be excited to market your music.

This week, learn why it is important for musicians and music entrepreneurs to have a street team. Learn the common mistakes musicians make in setting up a street team and the challenges they face in managing a street team.

Action Day: Vision Statement Checklist

Get started writing a vision statement for your music career with this checklist:

  1. Set aside 15 minutes to start writing your vision statement.
  2. Ask yourself where do you want to be in the music industry five years from now
  • What music genre are you in?
  • Are you signed to a major record label? indie record label?
  • How many albums are you selling a year? singles? downloads? ringtones?
  • Are you touring? If so, how many people are coming to your shows? Where are you touring? locally? regionally? nationally? internationally?
  • What income are you making?
  • Who are your fans? age? gender?

3.  Now write down your vision using this format:

______________ (number of years), ____________ (your name/name of your business) will become a successful ___________ (description of your music genre or description of your music business: include if it will be local, regional, national or international) by providing ____________ (description of your products and services) to __________ (description of your fans or customers).

Next week is Music Marketing Week.

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Vision Roadblocks

During Vision Week, I have discussed the benefits of getting a vision for your music career.  I’ve shared how vision gives you direction  for your music career.  It prevents you from wasting time and money.  Vision also helps you increase music sales.  If all of this is true, why do so many music artists and music entrepreneurs fail to create a vision for their music careers? Here are three roadblocks that I’ve seen get in the way of music artists and music entrepreneurs:

3 Roadblocks to Vision:

1) Lack of planning time

Most music artists and music entrepreneurs do not set aside the time to plan their music careers.  They don’t take the time to plan.

I want you to set aside 15 minutes. Fifteen minutes is all you need to think of a vision for your music career.  See Tuesday’s blog post on how to write a vision statement. How to Write a Vision Statement

2) Unbelief

Many music artists and music entrepreneurs truly do not believe that vision is important to their music careers.  They rather spend time in the music studio creating music or working on their music business.  They think the whole vision process is a waste of time. This is not true. I discussed on Monday how vision can save you time and money.  By getting clear on the vision for your music career, you can make quicker decisions on how you are going to market your music and what music you will make.  Vision reveals the information you need to make these important decisions as an artist.

3)  Wrong Focus on Limitations

Your vision is your future.  It is not where you are at today.  Too many artists and music entrepreneurs focus on their starting location and not their destination.  They get stuck seeing what they don’t have and the recording contract they don’t have.  They stop imagining and visualizing what they want because somewhere on their journey, they started doubting whether they could become a successful music artist or entrepreneur.

Your vision is a mental picture of where you are trying to go. It is not where you are today.  Don’t become paralyzed by where you are today.

So how do you overcome doubt? How can you start to dream again? How can you stop focusing on your limitations? Start focusing on where you want to go.  During this stage in building a long-term music career, you envision the career you want to have.  Later, in the upcoming weeks, I will show you how you can examine the weaknesses and limitations you may have. Right now, I just want you to get a clear vision.

The second thing you can do to overcome these vision roadblocks is to surround yourself with a positive group of people who believe in you as an artist or entrepreneur.  Find a group of people who will support you on this journey.  Find other artists who are on the same journey.  You will need a strong support system to help you on your path to success in the music industry.

Tomorrow: Action Day! I will give you a checklist of things you can do to start taking action on all of this information.

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Why Vision is Essential for Marketing Your Music

On Monday, I discussed why vision is the most important factor in achieving long-term success in the music industry and I gave you five reasons why  vision is important for your music career.  On Tuesday, I talked about four action steps you can take to get a vision for your music carer.  If you have not checked out these two blog posts, you can check them out here: How to Get Successful in the Music Industry Faster, A Vision for Your Music Career: A How-to Guide.

Today, I will discuss why having a vision for your music career can help you get your music into the hands of the people who will buy it.  Vision gives you direction as a music artist by providing you with the ability to imagine the type of artist you want to be and the music you want to create.  Your vision of where you want to be 5-10 years from now should include the people most responsible for your success in the music industry, your fans! Vision will help you identify the fans you need to get you where you want to go in the music industry.  Vision can help you create a marketing plan that will identify these ideal fans.

4 Reasons why vision is essential for marketing your music:

1.  Vision helps you pick your ideal music audience

Let me give you an example.  Let’s say my vision is to become a national R&B recording artist with female fans between the ages of 20-25.  This is a great vision because it is specific.  See Tuesday’s blog post for how to write a great vision statement: How to Write a Vision Statement for Your Music Career.

This vision statement identifies my target audience (female fans between the ages of 20-25).  Since my vision is to become a national R&B recording artist, my ideal music audience is female fans located in the United States.  My audience is not females between the ages of 20-25 residing in foreign countries.  My audience is also not limited to the state that I reside in.  Do you see how my vision has clarified my marketing plan? My vision has helped me decide who I am going to market to and what states I am going to market in.  Too many artists want to answer these specific marketing questions without first determining the broader vision of their music career.

2. Vision provides you with a clear marketing plan to reach your ideal music audience.

Back to my example, since I have developed a clear vision of the artist I want to be, a national R&B recording artist with female fans between the ages of 20-25, I can now develop an effective marketing plan to reach my target audience.  I can now ask these questions: where do females between the ages of 20-25 shop? What magazines, newspapers, and books do they read? What television shows do they watch? What type of music do they listen to?  What type of R&B songs do they like and enjoy?  In my example, my vision helped me pick the target audience for my music and it helped me develop a plan to get my music in front of them. Vision can help you do the same for your music career.

3.  Vision helps you increase music sales.

Ok, so we have seen how vision can help you pick the best audience for your music.  Vision also helps you figure out the path you need to take to create the music they enjoy and will want to buy. Once you have identified your ideal audience, you can now figure out what music they are currently buying.  What music artists do they listen to? What music do they like? You should know what kind of music your target audience enjoys and make that music.  Simple, right? It really is.  If you know the demographics of your target audience and you know where you can find them, then now you know exactly how to put your music in front of them. So now you have the right music in front of the right audience and this my friend is where music purchases are made.

4.  Vision helps you create long-term success in the music industry.

Let’s recap. Vision helps you pick the ideal audience for your music.  Vision provides you with a clear marketing plan to get your music in front of the right audience.  So vision gets your music in front of an audience who will buy your music and thus increases your music sales and income.  This leaves us with the final and most important reason for why vision is essential for marketing your music.  Vision helps you create long-term success in the music industry because it helps you establish a long-term relationship with your target audience.  Vision clarifies your marketing plan by establishing the type of artist you are, identifying the ideal audience for the music you make, and revealing how to get your music in front of that ideal audience.  Therefore, vision helps you deliver the type of music your ideal audience wants to hear and wants to buy.  You will develop a long-term relationship with them because you are now consistently giving your audience what they need.

Music artists who have been successful in developing a long-term career in the music industry understand that consistently meeting the needs of their fans is a key to long-term success in the industry; vision can help you achieve that!

A Vision for Your Music Career: A How-to Guide

Yesterday’s blog post discussed how important vision is for achieving long term success in the music industry.  If you missed yesterday’s post, check it out here: How to Get Successful in the Music Industry Faster.

Today I’m going to give you 4 practical, action steps you need to take to start your path to success in the music industry.

Four Action Steps:

1) Think big!

I want you to imagine the type of artist you want to be. Paint a mental picture of the type of music career you want.  Don’t think about your limitations.  Don’t focus on where you’re at now.  Don’t focus on your starting location but focus on your destination.  I don’t want you to think about a lack of start-up money or the lack of industry connections you may have.  Think about where you want to be 5-10 years from now.

2) Be specific! What exactly do you want to see happen? Your vision should be detailed.  Here are some questions to guide your thinking:

If you are a music artist, in 5-10 years:

  • How many albums and/or mixtapes are you releasing each year?
  • How many albums are you selling a year?
  • Are you touring? Where? locally? regionally? nationally? internationally?
  • How many people are coming to your shows?

3) Set a date for completion. Set a deadline.  When are you getting there? When will you see the success that you are envisioning? Your deadline can be 5-10 years from now.  You should set your vision for at least three years into the future.

4) Write it down. Don’t just think about your vision.  Write it down.  Your written vision is going to be your motivation to keep going in the music industry when people tell you to quit.  It will help remind you of why you are doing what you are doing.  It will help you stay true to who you are as an artist and where you want to go.

How to Write Your Vision:

Here is a simple, easy fill in the blank form that you can use to write your own vision statement for your music career in 5 minutes:

______________ (number of years), ____________ (your name/name of your business) will become a successful ___________ (description of your music genre or description of your music business: include if it will be local, regional, national or international) by providing ____________ (description of your products and services) to __________ (description of your fans or customers).

Here’s an example vision statement for a music artist:

Five years from now, Angela Carter, will become a successful national R&B recording artist by providing classic soul music to men and women between the ages of 25-45 who are desperately waiting for the return of real R&B.

Here’s an example of a vision statement if you are a music business owner:

Five years from now, Kingdom Records will become a successful Christian record label by providing production, A&R, and marketing services to its Christian recording artists.

These are just examples to get you started.

Leave me a comment on this blog with your vision statement.